Archive for the ‘Visual Art’ Category

HCX Rasin Lakay Installation

10.21.20

HCX Rasin Lakay Installation

Haiti Cultural Exchange presents RASIN LAKAY:

A site specific installation featuring works by Pyelila, Steven Baboun, Rejin Leys, Richard Louissaint, and Marie St. Cyr.
Held in partnership with the Westbrook Memorial Garden & Brooklyn Queens Land Trust, with funding support from the New York State Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation.
Exhibition Opening: Saturday, October 24 | 2-5pm
*No more than 10 people in the garden at once. Masks must be worn at all times.
October 15 – November 15, 2020
Westbrook Memorial Garden
1233 Pacific Ave., Brooklyn, NY 11216

Open Hours: Thursday, Friday: 2-5pm Saturday, Sunday: 12-5pm

Performances by:
Fritz Bernardin (Saturday, October 24)
Sheila Anozier & Tiga Jean-Baptiste (Sunday, November 1)
Alexandra Jean-Joseph & Sky Menesky of Imamou Lele (Saturday, November 7)

DSCF3588DSCF9818DSCF3550DSCF3556Photos by Emily Schiffer

Rejin LeysUpdated_RasinLakay_Banner_WithGromets_12x15

 

 

Pierre-Richard Raphael (Pyelila) is a young Haitian visual artist, specializing in Illustration, Photography and Graphic Design. Since his childhood, he had deep interests in Haitian folklore and fantasy. Which has always shaped his art into a tool used to tell every beautiful story Haiti has to tell. After his Art studies at Ecole Nationale des Arts (ENARTS) in Port-au-Prince, he embarked on a freelance career in visual art. This, has given him a form of freedom that he uses to delve into the illustration of many aspects of the Haitian heritage that need a voice.

Find out more about Pyelila by following his channels:
Instagram | Facebook

 

Steven Baboun is an artist and photographer from Port-au-Prince, Haiti and based in New York City. He received his Bachelor’s degree in Film and Media Arts and a minor in Education Studies at American University in Washington, DC. He’s currently an MFA Photography student at Parsons School of Design with an anticipation degree completion date of August 2020.  Baboun creates through photography, installation, video, and performance art. His work explores diverse social issues within the Haitian community such as queerness, race and social class, politics, religion (namely Vodou and Catholicism), and multi-cultural identities. Baboun presents to the world the complexities of Haitian society and how Haiti is an incubator for innovation, creativity, and storytelling. His works have traveled to Haiti, New York City, Los Angeles, China, Miami, and South Korea.

Find out more about Steven’s work by following his channels: Instagram | Website

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Rejin Leys is a mixed media artist and paper maker based in New York, whose work has been exhibited at such venues as Centro Cultural de España, Santo Domingo, DR; Kentler International Drawing Space, NY; Queens Museum, NY; and Les Ateliers J.R. Jerome, PaP, Haiti. Her work is in the collections of the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, Yale University, and Rutgers University Caribbean Studies Department, and she is a recipient of a fellowship from the New York Foundation for the Arts.

Find out more about Rejin’s work by following her channels: Instagram | Facebook | Website

Richard Louissaint is a first-generation Haitian-American filmmaker and photographer from New York City. Growing up in Queens, he was exposed to a wide spectrum of the Caribbean diaspora but was primarily influenced by Haitian and African-American culture.  His work centers on people of color, especially those of Haitian descent, through portraiture, film and documentaries. His work has been exhibited at the Brooklyn Museum, Wilmer Jennings Gallery at Kenkeleba, and most recently at the Wyckoff House Museum. His films have screened at the Haiti Film Fest, New York Short Film Festival, and Newark International Film Festival. Richard also holds a MFA in Creative Writing from Brooklyn College.

Find out more about Richard’s work by following his channels: Instagram | Facebook | Website

Marie E. Saint-Cyr is a visual artist whose work explores how we interact within imagined space by juxtaposing interior and exterior spaces. As a young Haitian-American artist, the colors in Saint-Cyr’s paintings evoke the charm and vibrancy of Caribbean pastorals alongside the urgency and layered energy of urban landscapes. Marie migrated to the United States from Haiti at the age of eight and creates her art in Wyandanch, New York. She studied at the Fashion Institute of Technology and at Lorenzo de’ Medici in Florence, Italy and has traveled and studied art throughout Europe.

Find out more about Marie’s work by following her channels: Facebook | Website

 

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“Migration” by Madjeen Isaac

10.21.20

“Migration” by Madjeen Isaac

“Migration” is a community mural by Haitian American artist Madjeen Isaac. The design visualizes the journey of immigrant residents to the Flatbush neighborhood and the ways in which they carry the legacy of their ancestors.

This beautiful mural was commissioned by Haiti Cultural Exchange with support from the NYC Department of Cultural Affairs and Council Member Farah Louis, and in partnership with the Department of Transportation’s Art Program (DOT Art) and Little Haiti BK.

Watch the HCX video on the making of “Migration” by clicking on the image below:

Mural 4Mural 5See more work-in-progress photos here. Photos by Richard Louissaint.Mural 2

Watch Lakou NOU artist Madjeen Isaac tell us about her experience beautifying this Flatbush mural highlighting the migration experience here.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Madjeen Isaac specializes in oil painting, as she focuses on creating images based on her Haitian American culture. Growing up in a neighborhood where it is predominantly Caribbean immigrants, Isaac allowed her process to give her a sense of purpose from the memories and cultures that have shaped her. She says, “Flatbush is where I have lived most of my life. Flatbush is a place that emits culture and hustle. Overtime, I have developed a concern for immigrant youth and children of immigrants, becoming “Americanized” or assimilated out of fear, without reflecting back on the culture of their ancestors”. Her works are based on celebrating one’s existence and differences while showing patronage to the Haitian culture. Madjeen currently attends the Fashion Institute of Technology, and is expected to receive her BFA in Fine Art, May 2018.

Her focus as Lakou NOU artist-in-residence working in  Flatbush was to expand her work by focusing primarily on Haitian youth. She facilitated art making workshops with a core group, guiding them to weave in the parts of their culture that are not so obviously relatable nor taught at school. These workshops covered topics as such, “ how will the youth go about exploring their culture and forming their own identities? ” and “ how can art making be a catalyst in forming narratives about the Flatbush community in the perspective of the youth?”

 

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Rasin Lakay features Joanne Petit-Frère

10.07.20

Braid.Cora Quarantina

Joanne Petit-Frère’s latest directorial work — a re-opening of [Braid.Cora Quarantina] — is a short, docu-film performance that chronicles the artist’s studio practice as well as her drag-queen-teaching-mascot- process stemming from hair & art production house, JoGoesWest. She performs as BraidCora Quarantina. Her latest collection of hair-braided sculptures created during quarantine highlights, a peek into her conceptual process.

Click on either of the images below to watch Braid.Cora Quarantina:

Braid.Cora Quarantina Braid.Cora Quarantina 2

 

 

 

 

Joanne Petit-Frère addresses the human body as a site of beauty and adornment. Drawing on various African Diaspora traditions, Old American Western movies, the photographs of Cindy Sherman, the history of Haiti, and a range of other sources, Petit-Frère makes films, drawings and labor-intensive tapestries and sculptures that involve weaving by hand sometimes with eight or more colors of synthetic hair. Many of Joanne Petit-Frère’s wall-works and sculpture are activated by performance. Petit-Frère enlists performance as a means by which to think about our bodies and those of the people around us. At a moment in which human touch and presence in society is increasingly charged, Petit-Frère’s artwork reveals human beauty and form, the power of identity, and the shifting currents of social dialogue.

Find out more about Joanne’s work by following her channels: Instagram | Facebook

 

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Rasin Lakay features Pyelila

09.24.20

Lanmou

Pyelila’s LANMOU series features plants and their love languages. “I’ve always imagined that plants have relationships amongst themselves. Whether it be amicable, romantic or familial. Each time I look at them, I always imagine how they must interact and how they decide to get along in order to survive if they were animated.

I created this illustration series to show how I see them in my mind. I’ve depicted them in various types of love.”

Click on any of the images below to view the illustration–and leave a comment–on the HCX Instagram account:

“I started off with love of self. I was inspired by a beautiful orange tree in my backyard, that always gifts us the sweetest oranges. She always seems to take good care of herself no matter the circumstances, she always nourishes herself with her environment.”
“The second piece hones in on a comforting love, inspired by my Aloe Vera plant. It is the most resilient plant in our garden and offers the most healing benefits.” ⁣
“Ginger to me has always come off as strong spirited, softening when faced with a love accepting of its flaws and all its ups and downs, always bringing about its soft side in the end.”⁣
“A love that doesn’t require anything from the outside world. All of its might stems from being with one another. The Citronella plant gives me that vibration, each branch helps the other to stand tall, one protecting the other from their environment to keep them safe and strong.”⁣
“Senseveria (referred to as donkey’s ears in Haitian Creole) is one of the most resilient plants, to come across a dying one would mean the sun no longer rises. Likewise for the love of a mother, a love that will never cease to multiply its roots, that will never tarnish as long as there is life.”
“Oftentimes, we don’t realize that we’re toxic for someone, when that person starts to call us out on the walls we’ve put up, that’s when we come to realize how messed up we are. Even with good intentions, a bad apple is a bad apple. Often, it’s the stories we tell about our presence that are toxic. It’s always good that we realize this, so that we can do that person a big favor.This is my Aloe plant that’s always preventing the leaves of my Monstera plant from staying whole, it’s always tearing a leaf, or poking one. Eventually, I had to move the poor thing away from it.”

 

Pierre-Richard Raphael (Pyelila) is a young Haitian visual artist, specializing in Illustration, Photography and Graphic Design. Since his childhood, he had deep interests in Haitian folklore and fantasy. Which has always shaped his art into a tool used to tell every beautiful story Haiti has to tell. After his Art studies at Ecole Nationale des Arts (ENARTS) in Port-au-Prince, he embarked on a freelance career in visual art. This, has given him a form of freedom that he uses to delve into the illustration of many aspects of the Haitian heritage that need a voice.

Find out more about Pyelila by following his channels:
Instagram | Facebook

 

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