Archive for the ‘Archive’ Category

Ann Pale with Lakou NOU 2017!

01.16.18

Join us for our signature Ann Pale | Café Conversation with Lakou NOU 2017 Artists Diane Exavier, Glenda Lezeau, and Jasmine Plantin. They will be discussing their work as part of the Lakou NOU artist residency program at Haiti Cultural Exchange. This project provides artists of Haitian descent with the opportunity to create and present new work by connecting their skills and talents to four traditionally underserved Brooklyn neighborhoods, home to generations of Haitians and Haitian-Americans: Crown Heights, Canarsie, East Flatbush, and Flatbush.

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Glenda Lezeau is a lover of all things Konpa from the keyboard solos to the dance moves. She is a piano player determined to shed a different light on Haiti by sharing the sounds of Haitian music along with its beautiful culture. Her passion for music strengthens and intensifies as she advances a movement of positive, inspirational music that is powerful enough to impact others. With over 20 years of training as a pianist and violist, Glenda has performed at many high profile venues, including Alice Tully Hall at Lincoln Center, The Plaza Hotel and New York’s City Hall. She holds a diploma in Instrumental Music from Fiorella H. Laguardia High School of the Arts and a Bachelor of Arts in Psychology from the University of Connecticut.

Jasmine Plantin was born and raised in New York and has been surrounded by art and design since she was a child. She attended Parsons the New School for Design and Central Saint Martins for her undergraduate degree, where she was nominated for “Designer of the Year” and graduated with a BFA in Apparel Design in 2013. While pursuing her degree she apprenticed with design studios Proenza Schouler, Altuzarra and Phillip Lim until she graduated and began designing menswear for Greenpoint based company Outlier. Her work in textiles and fashion has appeared in international publications, such as Teen Vogue and Oyster Magazine, and has been displayed in Saks Fifth Avenue and at exhibitions in Paris, France.

Diane Exavier creates performance events, public programs, and games that challenge viewers to participate in the active realization of a theater that rejects passive reception. She is also an arts educator with a pedagogy that focuses on creating reflective spaces for young people. Her work has been presented at Westmont College, California State University: Northridge, New Urban Arts (Providence), West Chicago City Museum, and in New York: Bowery Poetry Club, Dixon Place, Independent Curators International, Medialia Gallery, and more. Her most recent play Good Blood was workshopped in residency with the Flea Theater. Her writing appears in Cunjuh Magazine, Daughter Literary Magazine, The Atlas Review, and The Racial Imaginary: Writers on Race in the Life of the Mind.

This event will be moderated by Veroneque Ignace, current HCX Programs Coordinator. Veroneque Ignace is a Haitian-American artist, dancer, and former Lakou NOU artist resident for the programs inaugural year.

For more information on HCX’s Lakou NOU Artist in Residency Program, please visit our website:
www.haiticulturalx.org/lakounou

DATE/TIME: Friday, February 9th | 6pm to 9pm
LOCATION: FiveMyles Gallery | 558 St Johns Pl, Brooklyn, NY 11238 | MAP
ADMISSION: $10 Suggested Donation

Drinks and refreshments will be served at 6pm and program begins at 7pm.

RSVP FOR THE FACEBOOK EVENT HERE.

Posted in An n' Pale, Archive | No Comments »

Nubian Nene’s Crown Heights Creatives | Lakou NOU Recap

01.08.18

Happy New Year! We’re starting 2018 by reflecting on artist-in-residence Nadine “Nubian Nene” Sylvestre’s presentation of her project “Crown Heights Creatives.” The event concluded the Lakou NOU 2017 presentation series on December 22nd and sent us off into the holiday season motivated to breathe, move, and meditate on the impact we have on our neighborhoods.

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Nene’s residency and culminating project was based on her belief that basic human services are things a city should provide its residents. In “Crown Heights Creatives”, Nene documents the personal perspective of residents on environmental justice and access to healthy public spaces. She assesses the Crown Heights community needs, raises awareness about the presence of local street farms, gardens and the availability of healthy foods, and engages the creatives of that community to share their skills, expertise and teachings towards collective action.

The event included live drumming and original music by Lakou NOU 2016 residents Okai Fleurimont & DJ Sabine Blaizin, a dance class taught by Nene herself, live painting by Haitian-American visual artist Madjeen Isaac, and a multi-media video and performance installation conceptualized by Nene for this residency. Photographer and videographer Richard Louissant helped to create the video installation, accentuating the way Nene’s movement reflected on space-based relationships and inheritance.

In her new performance piece created for the Lakou NOU residency, Nubian Nene pulls from her Haitian heritage, connecting the dots between Crown Heights, its residents, and herself – a Haitian-Canadian woman living in Brooklyn.  She danced in honor and in portrayal of Kouzen Zaka, the agriculture/harvest/hard worker lwa of Haitian Vodou. By doing this she further enforced the idea of community collective action and relationship to space.

NUBIAN NENE Lakou Nou Performance – Friday, December 22, 2017 from Richard Louissaint on Vimeo.

Find more photos from Nene’s event on Facebook by clicking here.

Posted in Archive, Dance, HCX Programs, Lakou NOU, Music, Uncategorized | No Comments »

Diane’s Each Body is a Miracle | Lakou NOU Recap

12.13.17

Diane Exavier, Lakou NOU 2017 artist resident in East Flatbush, describes her project Each Body is a Miracle, as “…a social praxis; a play in retreat; an exploration of health, wellness, and creativity in East Flatbush.” The project, inspired by her original play Good Blood, allowed her to delve deeper into the issues and themes of the play: immigration, partnership/intimacy, and health — via research, community crafting, and social practice.


She offers:

From the journey of Caribbean immigrants as part of the African Diaspora to the arrival of the global epidemic of AIDS in 1980s New York, Good Blood crosses language, time, and even the ocean in an attempt to question the contracts we make, the conditions we live under, and what it means to reach for a love that might outlive you. This fall, Each Body Is a Miracle offers the community of East Flatbush a chance to ask some of the same questions the play’s characters tackle: How do we live every single day? How does that help us take care of our bodies? What are the conditions we agree to in order to do that?

She segmented her project into three parts: 1) field notes, where she asked, what health issues are most affecting the lives and bodies of Haitian community members in East Flatbush today? 2) community crafting, where she facilitated a floral crown making workshop, related to the Haitian traditional practice of plasaj, and 3) reportage, an exercise in active dramaturgy, combining research and documentation with live performance.

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On November 9th, at the East Flatbush Branch Brooklyn Public Library, Diane presented part 2: Crown Crafting. The workshop was filled with youth visiting the library on that day. She reflects on this in her project’s tumblr writing:

One small, quiet boy, with skin as dark as my father’s entered the room. He ate a few cookies before mumbling, “I want to make a flower.” I obliged his request by placing wire around his head, fitting him for a crown, not daring to pretend he would ever be a king. I showed him how to attach flower and he was set on his way. He quietly worked on his floral crown for about 45 minutes before he finished in silence and filled up his snack plate with more cheese puffs. I remarked how wonderful his crown looked and held up a compact mirror for him to look into. He stared at his reflection, so satisfied and happy with what he had created and how it was resting on his head. I asked him if he made it with a wish in mind. He nodded yes.

Lessons learned from part 2, were shared on December 9th, at Brooklyn Fete, during Diane’s staged presentation of Good Blood and during the second rendition of community crown crafting.

Find photos by Richard Louissaint on Facebook here!

Posted in Archive, Lakou NOU, Literature | No Comments »

Taking on Responsibility by Alex Leon, Programs Outreach Volunteer

12.05.17

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My name is Alexandria Leon. I attend the Packer Collegiate Institute where I’m currently in the 11th grade. At school, I enjoy playing tennis and I’ve been doing so outside of school for about 5 years. As a result of my hard work and dedication, I am now number one on my high school team. A resident of Park Slope, Brooklyn, I am most interested in Math and History. Math and History both interest me because they help me think deeply and exercise my problem solving skills. My other interests include playing music and photography. I can play 4 instruments: piano, guitar, drums, and ukulele. I really love photography, especially portrait photography as I find it helps me connect with people on a different and more intimate level.

These days, I’m learning to speak French because I think it will bring me closer to my family since, though I can understand it, I can’t speak Creole. Working with Haiti Cultural Exchange is an important opportunity for me to get closer to family and to Haitian culture. Although both of my parents are Haitian and I’ve been surrounded by Haitian people my whole life, I don’t know nearly as much about Haitian culture or Haitian-American culture as I would like to. I’m really interested in learning about the Haitian community in the city and their work. I believe this would be a great way to learn more. I also want to work on public speaking, because it’s a very important skill that I want to develop. Working within Brooklyn community, through Haiti Cultural Exchange would help me become more comfortable doing this.

I believe that the work I will do at Haiti Cultural Exchange will help teach me more about taking on responsibility, building important communication skills, and most importantly, the Haitian community in Brooklyn.

Posted in Archive, Uncategorized | No Comments »

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