Archive for the ‘Visual Art’ Category

Rasin Lakay features Andre Eugène

12.18.20

Kowona Kwonik–Chronicle of Corona

Andre Eugène, Haitian artist, co-director of the Ghetto Biennale and one of the founders of Atis Rezistans, reveals how he makes work using local carving skills and the creative addition of recycled materials. At the same time he, and other members of Atis Rezistans, reflect on the effect of the worldwide Coronavirus pandemic has affected their lives.

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Click on the image below to watch Kowona Kwonik.Kowona Kwonik

 

 

Andre Eugène was born in downtown Port-au-Prince in 1959. He is a leading figure in the artists’ collective known as Atis Rezistans and a broader movement known as the Sculptors of Grand Rue. Eugène fused the fetish effigy with an apocalyptic MTV futuristic vision. Much of his work is figurative using human skulls for heads and imbued with a bold sense of irony, sexuality and humour. In 2006 Andre Eugène contributed to a large-scale collective sculptural work, which is a permanent exhibit at the International Museum of Slavery in Liverpool. His work has been shown at the Muesum of Ethnography, Geneva; at the Parc de la Villette, Paris; the Fowler Museum, UCLA, Los Angeles; Nottingham Contemporary, UK and at the Grand Palais, Paris. His work was included in the Haitian Pavillions at the 54th Venice Biennale. Andre Eugène is the co-director of the Ghetto Biennale, which has been held in Port-au-Prince since 2009. In 2015 Andre Eugene and his partner, Leah Gordon, were the recipients of the Colección Patricia Phelps de Cisneros Travel Award for Central America and the Caribbean

Find out more about Andre’s work by following the Ghetto Biennale channels: Instagram | Website

 

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Rasin Lakay features Coralie Noisette

10.21.20

The Shadow Self

“The project, “Shadow Self: Transforming Fear into Light”, is inspired by one’s internal exploration around self-identity, personal growth, and the higher consciousness. During the COVID-19 pandemic, we’ve all been confronted with amplified stress and confusion encouraging us to reevaluate our external and inner worlds. Personally, I’ve been faced with internal conflicts and questions such as, “Who am I?”, “Why do I feel this way?”, and “Where am I headed?”. As a result, I’ve been diving deeper into the idea of my “shadow self”. With more time to reflect during these uncertain times, these areas of “self” have come to the surface and are becoming harder to ignore. Through a compilation of audio-visuals and original poetry, my project aims to confront, heal and transform the shadows that have veiled my connection to the Higher Self.” – Coralie Noisette

Click on the images below to watch each chapter of “Shadow Self” on the HCX YouTube channel:

The first chapter “Confront Thyself” is a personal journey to identify and examine the darker side of myself. In order to move forward in life, we need to understand and accept that there are various facets of our persona that we may not want to deal with. However, through this confrontation we take steps closer to overcoming what no longer serves us in our life. “Confront Thyself” is a brief reflection of my internal dialogue to address my shadows.

Chapter 1

The second chapter, “Heal Thyself”, encourages one to make peace with their shadows. To do so, we must find the courage to go in the depths of our core to understand our subconscious pain. Instead of fighting these negative aspects of self, we should use the contrasts to shed light on areas of healing. By accepting our shadows, we begin to dismantle the ego’s grasp on self, and we become closer to our authentic self. “Heal Thyself” gives the viewer an inside look into my healing process.Chapter 2

The third and final chapter, “Transform Thyself”, is the result of when the shadow self meets healing. Transformation is the energetic shift that takes place within, also known as growth. Once we integrate our shadows into our understanding of self, we take back our power and its influence in our daily lives. We become more aware of our true essence, and gain power over our egos. “Transform Thyself” seeks to guide us towards our higher selves by transforming fear into light.

Chapter 3

 

 

 

 

 

 

Coralie Noisette With a mission to grow, and a lover of love, Coralie Noisette is a self-taught artist of Haitian descent, born and raised in Chicago, Illinois. In 2013, she decided to buy a one-way ticket to Haiti for a new chapter in her life that allowed her to connect with her Haitian roots. Since then, Haiti has enabled Coralie to further tap into her creative spirit though its rich culture, natural beauty, and mystic energy. As an artist and poet, she seeks to understand the connection between the spiritual and physical realms, with an underlying theme of self-exploration. Her painting style is inspired by optic art and color therapy, playing with the viewer’s vision and illustrating the intricate layers of what one would deem as “reality”. The original short poetic proses that Coralie writes, and which often accompany her artworks, are driven by her quest to make sense of some of life’s impenetrable questions. Through self-examination and confronting our shadows, we gain better awareness of who we are and our place in the world. Through her art, Coralie hopes to awaken the viewers’ eyes, minds and spirits to the infinite possibilities of the universe.

Find out more about Coralie’s work by following her channels: Instagram | Facebook

 

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HCX Rasin Lakay Installation

10.21.20

HCX Rasin Lakay Installation

Haiti Cultural Exchange presents RASIN LAKAY:

A site specific installation featuring works by Pyelila, Steven Baboun, Rejin Leys, Richard Louissaint, and Marie St. Cyr.
Held in partnership with the Westbrook Memorial Garden & Brooklyn Queens Land Trust, with funding support from the New York State Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation.
Exhibition Opening: Saturday, October 24 | 2-5pm
*No more than 10 people in the garden at once. Masks must be worn at all times.
October 15 – November 15, 2020
Westbrook Memorial Garden
1233 Pacific Ave., Brooklyn, NY 11216

Open Hours: Thursday, Friday: 2-5pm Saturday, Sunday: 12-5pm

Performances by:
Fritz Bernardin (Saturday, October 24)
Sheila Anozier & Tiga Jean-Baptiste (Sunday, November 1)
Alexandra Jean-Joseph & Sky Menesky of Imamou Lele (Saturday, November 7)

DSCF3588DSCF9818DSCF3550DSCF3556Photos by Emily Schiffer

Rejin LeysUpdated_RasinLakay_Banner_WithGromets_12x15

 

 

Pierre-Richard Raphael (Pyelila) is a young Haitian visual artist, specializing in Illustration, Photography and Graphic Design. Since his childhood, he had deep interests in Haitian folklore and fantasy. Which has always shaped his art into a tool used to tell every beautiful story Haiti has to tell. After his Art studies at Ecole Nationale des Arts (ENARTS) in Port-au-Prince, he embarked on a freelance career in visual art. This, has given him a form of freedom that he uses to delve into the illustration of many aspects of the Haitian heritage that need a voice.

Find out more about Pyelila by following his channels:
Instagram | Facebook

 

Steven Baboun is an artist and photographer from Port-au-Prince, Haiti and based in New York City. He received his Bachelor’s degree in Film and Media Arts and a minor in Education Studies at American University in Washington, DC. He’s currently an MFA Photography student at Parsons School of Design with an anticipation degree completion date of August 2020.  Baboun creates through photography, installation, video, and performance art. His work explores diverse social issues within the Haitian community such as queerness, race and social class, politics, religion (namely Vodou and Catholicism), and multi-cultural identities. Baboun presents to the world the complexities of Haitian society and how Haiti is an incubator for innovation, creativity, and storytelling. His works have traveled to Haiti, New York City, Los Angeles, China, Miami, and South Korea.

Find out more about Steven’s work by following his channels: Instagram | Website

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Rejin Leys is a mixed media artist and paper maker based in New York, whose work has been exhibited at such venues as Centro Cultural de España, Santo Domingo, DR; Kentler International Drawing Space, NY; Queens Museum, NY; and Les Ateliers J.R. Jerome, PaP, Haiti. Her work is in the collections of the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, Yale University, and Rutgers University Caribbean Studies Department, and she is a recipient of a fellowship from the New York Foundation for the Arts.

Find out more about Rejin’s work by following her channels: Instagram | Facebook | Website

Richard Louissaint is a first-generation Haitian-American filmmaker and photographer from New York City. Growing up in Queens, he was exposed to a wide spectrum of the Caribbean diaspora but was primarily influenced by Haitian and African-American culture.  His work centers on people of color, especially those of Haitian descent, through portraiture, film and documentaries. His work has been exhibited at the Brooklyn Museum, Wilmer Jennings Gallery at Kenkeleba, and most recently at the Wyckoff House Museum. His films have screened at the Haiti Film Fest, New York Short Film Festival, and Newark International Film Festival. Richard also holds a MFA in Creative Writing from Brooklyn College.

Find out more about Richard’s work by following his channels: Instagram | Facebook | Website

Marie E. Saint-Cyr is a visual artist whose work explores how we interact within imagined space by juxtaposing interior and exterior spaces. As a young Haitian-American artist, the colors in Saint-Cyr’s paintings evoke the charm and vibrancy of Caribbean pastorals alongside the urgency and layered energy of urban landscapes. Marie migrated to the United States from Haiti at the age of eight and creates her art in Wyandanch, New York. She studied at the Fashion Institute of Technology and at Lorenzo de’ Medici in Florence, Italy and has traveled and studied art throughout Europe.

Find out more about Marie’s work by following her channels: Facebook | Website

 

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“Migration” by Madjeen Isaac

10.21.20

“Migration” by Madjeen Isaac

“Migration” is a community mural by Haitian American artist Madjeen Isaac. The design visualizes the journey of immigrant residents to the Flatbush neighborhood and the ways in which they carry the legacy of their ancestors.

This beautiful mural was commissioned by Haiti Cultural Exchange with support from the NYC Department of Cultural Affairs and Council Member Farah Louis, and in partnership with the Department of Transportation’s Art Program (DOT Art) and Little Haiti BK.

Watch the HCX video on the making of “Migration” by clicking on the image below:

Mural 4Mural 5See more work-in-progress photos here. Photos by Richard Louissaint.Mural 2

Watch Lakou NOU artist Madjeen Isaac tell us about her experience beautifying this Flatbush mural highlighting the migration experience here.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Madjeen Isaac specializes in oil painting, as she focuses on creating images based on her Haitian American culture. Growing up in a neighborhood where it is predominantly Caribbean immigrants, Isaac allowed her process to give her a sense of purpose from the memories and cultures that have shaped her. She says, “Flatbush is where I have lived most of my life. Flatbush is a place that emits culture and hustle. Overtime, I have developed a concern for immigrant youth and children of immigrants, becoming “Americanized” or assimilated out of fear, without reflecting back on the culture of their ancestors”. Her works are based on celebrating one’s existence and differences while showing patronage to the Haitian culture. Madjeen currently attends the Fashion Institute of Technology, and is expected to receive her BFA in Fine Art, May 2018.

Her focus as Lakou NOU artist-in-residence working in  Flatbush was to expand her work by focusing primarily on Haitian youth. She facilitated art making workshops with a core group, guiding them to weave in the parts of their culture that are not so obviously relatable nor taught at school. These workshops covered topics as such, “ how will the youth go about exploring their culture and forming their own identities? ” and “ how can art making be a catalyst in forming narratives about the Flatbush community in the perspective of the youth?”

 

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