Archive for the ‘HCX Programs’ Category

Rasin Lakay features Andre Eugène

12.18.20

Kowona Kwonik–Chronicle of Corona

Andre Eugène, Haitian artist, co-director of the Ghetto Biennale and one of the founders of Atis Rezistans, reveals how he makes work using local carving skills and the creative addition of recycled materials. At the same time he, and other members of Atis Rezistans, reflect on the effect of the worldwide Coronavirus pandemic has affected their lives.

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Click on the image below to watch Kowona Kwonik.Kowona Kwonik

 

 

Andre Eugène was born in downtown Port-au-Prince in 1959. He is a leading figure in the artists’ collective known as Atis Rezistans and a broader movement known as the Sculptors of Grand Rue. Eugène fused the fetish effigy with an apocalyptic MTV futuristic vision. Much of his work is figurative using human skulls for heads and imbued with a bold sense of irony, sexuality and humour. In 2006 Andre Eugène contributed to a large-scale collective sculptural work, which is a permanent exhibit at the International Museum of Slavery in Liverpool. His work has been shown at the Muesum of Ethnography, Geneva; at the Parc de la Villette, Paris; the Fowler Museum, UCLA, Los Angeles; Nottingham Contemporary, UK and at the Grand Palais, Paris. His work was included in the Haitian Pavillions at the 54th Venice Biennale. Andre Eugène is the co-director of the Ghetto Biennale, which has been held in Port-au-Prince since 2009. In 2015 Andre Eugene and his partner, Leah Gordon, were the recipients of the Colección Patricia Phelps de Cisneros Travel Award for Central America and the Caribbean

Find out more about Andre’s work by following the Ghetto Biennale channels: Instagram | Website

 

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Art in the Garden: Fall Sundays | Recap

10.26.20

123022220_10158566461291830_2717303459505903881_oThe Haitian Creole saying “fanm se poto mitan” expresses the idea that women are the pillar of any society. HCX Cultural arts programming through June 2021, will unpack the role of the feminine in Haitian and Diaspora settings, examining both traditional views, and ways in which these roles are being challenged and rethought in modern times. To kick off this season, during the months of October & November, we presented FANM d’Ayiti | honoring Haitian women as pillars of our society through live music, dance, and song.  

On Sunday, October 18th Haiti Cultural Exchange hosted Art in the Garden at the Brooklyn Botanic Garden with performances by Alexandra Jean-Joseph & Sky Menesky of Imamou Lele where they presented traditional Haitian dance & drumming. The theme of their performance was in alignment with HCX’s current theme FANM, where they emulated women across cultures, classes, and various walks of life. Attendees lounged comfortably on the lawn during their presentation.  

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Vocalist and flutist, Melanie Charles presented an homage to Haitian women musicians through the ages and was accompanied by guitarist, Eddy Bourjolly. Spectators sang along to familiar tunes throughout their beautiful performance.  

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On Sunday, October 25th Sheila Anozier performed Songs of Ayiti: Haitian Folk and Vodou songs honoring the female deities accompanied by Tiga Jean Baptiste on Haitian drums. Fritz Bernardin closed out the day by performing his original compositions “Suite Folklorique Haitienne” & traditional Haitian Folk Songs on viola.  122967237_10158566515956830_5671312701656026657_o

It was a pleasure to present performances in the lovely fall setting of the Brooklyn Botanic Garden for a second year and as part of the first public programs since the pandemic. Being back in community with live Haitian music and dance felt so joyful, and we were truly fortunate to be able to curate artists whose presentations were developed for our year-long programmatic theme: FANM  123656752_10158585540556830_5261993006758460714_o

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Rasin Lakay features Coralie Noisette

10.21.20

The Shadow Self

“The project, “Shadow Self: Transforming Fear into Light”, is inspired by one’s internal exploration around self-identity, personal growth, and the higher consciousness. During the COVID-19 pandemic, we’ve all been confronted with amplified stress and confusion encouraging us to reevaluate our external and inner worlds. Personally, I’ve been faced with internal conflicts and questions such as, “Who am I?”, “Why do I feel this way?”, and “Where am I headed?”. As a result, I’ve been diving deeper into the idea of my “shadow self”. With more time to reflect during these uncertain times, these areas of “self” have come to the surface and are becoming harder to ignore. Through a compilation of audio-visuals and original poetry, my project aims to confront, heal and transform the shadows that have veiled my connection to the Higher Self.” – Coralie Noisette

Click on the images below to watch each chapter of “Shadow Self” on the HCX YouTube channel:

The first chapter “Confront Thyself” is a personal journey to identify and examine the darker side of myself. In order to move forward in life, we need to understand and accept that there are various facets of our persona that we may not want to deal with. However, through this confrontation we take steps closer to overcoming what no longer serves us in our life. “Confront Thyself” is a brief reflection of my internal dialogue to address my shadows.

Chapter 1

The second chapter, “Heal Thyself”, encourages one to make peace with their shadows. To do so, we must find the courage to go in the depths of our core to understand our subconscious pain. Instead of fighting these negative aspects of self, we should use the contrasts to shed light on areas of healing. By accepting our shadows, we begin to dismantle the ego’s grasp on self, and we become closer to our authentic self. “Heal Thyself” gives the viewer an inside look into my healing process.Chapter 2

The third and final chapter, “Transform Thyself”, is the result of when the shadow self meets healing. Transformation is the energetic shift that takes place within, also known as growth. Once we integrate our shadows into our understanding of self, we take back our power and its influence in our daily lives. We become more aware of our true essence, and gain power over our egos. “Transform Thyself” seeks to guide us towards our higher selves by transforming fear into light.

Chapter 3

 

 

 

 

 

 

Coralie Noisette With a mission to grow, and a lover of love, Coralie Noisette is a self-taught artist of Haitian descent, born and raised in Chicago, Illinois. In 2013, she decided to buy a one-way ticket to Haiti for a new chapter in her life that allowed her to connect with her Haitian roots. Since then, Haiti has enabled Coralie to further tap into her creative spirit though its rich culture, natural beauty, and mystic energy. As an artist and poet, she seeks to understand the connection between the spiritual and physical realms, with an underlying theme of self-exploration. Her painting style is inspired by optic art and color therapy, playing with the viewer’s vision and illustrating the intricate layers of what one would deem as “reality”. The original short poetic proses that Coralie writes, and which often accompany her artworks, are driven by her quest to make sense of some of life’s impenetrable questions. Through self-examination and confronting our shadows, we gain better awareness of who we are and our place in the world. Through her art, Coralie hopes to awaken the viewers’ eyes, minds and spirits to the infinite possibilities of the universe.

Find out more about Coralie’s work by following her channels: Instagram | Facebook

 

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Rasin Lakay features Joanne Petit-Frère

10.07.20

Braid.Cora Quarantina

Joanne Petit-Frère’s latest directorial work — a re-opening of [Braid.Cora Quarantina] — is a short, docu-film performance that chronicles the artist’s studio practice as well as her drag-queen-teaching-mascot- process stemming from hair & art production house, JoGoesWest. She performs as BraidCora Quarantina. Her latest collection of hair-braided sculptures created during quarantine highlights, a peek into her conceptual process.

Click on either of the images below to watch Braid.Cora Quarantina:

Braid.Cora Quarantina Braid.Cora Quarantina 2

 

 

 

 

Joanne Petit-Frère addresses the human body as a site of beauty and adornment. Drawing on various African Diaspora traditions, Old American Western movies, the photographs of Cindy Sherman, the history of Haiti, and a range of other sources, Petit-Frère makes films, drawings and labor-intensive tapestries and sculptures that involve weaving by hand sometimes with eight or more colors of synthetic hair. Many of Joanne Petit-Frère’s wall-works and sculpture are activated by performance. Petit-Frère enlists performance as a means by which to think about our bodies and those of the people around us. At a moment in which human touch and presence in society is increasingly charged, Petit-Frère’s artwork reveals human beauty and form, the power of identity, and the shifting currents of social dialogue.

Find out more about Joanne’s work by following her channels: Instagram | Facebook

 

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